THE LACK OF BASIC INFRASTRUCTURE MAKES
THE SANITATION CRISIS PARTICULARLY
ACUTE IN SLUMS, WHERE POPULATIONS WILL
DOUBLE TO 2 BILLION BY 2030.

The Problem: High cost of sanitation provision to serve poorest areas

In Kenya, at current rates, complete sanitation coverage will take 150 years. The economic impact is profound: the loss of productivity due to illness costs Kenya 1% of its GDP every year. Studies from Dakar, Senegal, a city with similar infrastructure challenges as Nairobi, Kenya, show that the annualized cost to provide sewered sanitation is $56 per person per year. To cover that cost, 94% is borne by the public sector and their funders.

The Solution: Lowering the cost of sanitation provision

By 2020, we plan to have an active network of 4,900 Fresh Life Toilets that will serve approximately 36% of the population – 200,000 people in Mukuru. Our model will prove to be cost efficient – serving residents at a cost of $13 per person per year with the government bearing only $6 per person per year of that cost. Our approach will cost the public sector 5 times less of what they spend on sewers.

At 500,000 people served, that cost drops to less than $5 / person / year. Achieving reduction in this metric will make our model compelling to governments looking to invest in cost-efficient models to solve the sanitation crisis and provide safe sanitation solutions for their residents.

KENYA FACES SIGNIFICANT CHALLENGES IN
INCREASING ITS AGRICULTURAL PRODUCTION TO
MEET THE DEMANDS OF A GROWING POPULATION.

The Problem: 80% of Kenyans rely on agriculture, yet sustainable supply of quality agricultural inputs is lacking.

The Kenyan Ministry of Agriculture has identified soil degradation a serious factor affecting food security in the country. They recommend that farmers use up to 10 tons of organic fertilizer per hectare to restore soil health.

Kenya’s feed millers have to contend with depleting stocks of fishmeal, the primary source of protein in animal feed. Fishmeal is unsustainably harvested from Kenya’s lakes, with massive variation in quantity and quality.

The industry produces 750,000 tonnes of animal feed per year, which is only about 60% of the required supply.

The Solution: Reliable, affordable, high quality and sustainable farm inputs

We sell consistent, locally-produced organic fertilizer and animal feed to Kenyan farmers who are seeing increased crop yield and animal weight by 30%. This means that smallholder farmers can grow more crops or raise better livestock and therefore make more money.

 

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